Egg Component Allergy Test

Ovalbumin, Ovomucoid


Test Code: 603833
Specimen Type: Blood

Description:

Egg Component Allergy Test

This test is used to determine if a person may have an allergic reaction to eggs.  Most allergies to chicken eggs are caused by a reaction to the egg whites.  It is rare for an allergic reaction to be triggered by the yolk.  The egg component test looks for IgE antibodies to 2 specific proteins found in egg whites, Ovalbumin and Ovomucoid.  Both ovalbumin and ovomucoid are present in raw eggs, but ovalbumin breaks down at higher temperatures, such as when the egg is cooked.  Having IgE antibodies against a specific egg protein can indicate if a person is more likely to have allergic symptoms. The amount of IgE antibodies a person has can also give an indication of whether or not they are likely to develop a tolerance later in life.

  • Negative IgE results for both ovalbumin and ovomucoid typically mean that a person is unlikely to have an allergic reaction to eggs. However, an allergic reaction can occur even if the results are negative.
  • A positive result for IgE antibodies to ovalbumin alone typically means that a person will be able to eat eggs that are fully cooked, but not when they are raw.
  • A positive result for IgE antibodies to ovomucoid typically means that a person may not be able to tolerate either raw or cooked eggs. 
  • People with low levels of antibodies may develop a tolerance over time but higher antibody levels indicate an allergy which is likely to persist for life.
  • It is important to note that this test helps predict your risk of having a reaction and does not necessarily mean that you will have allergy symptoms. Additional tests (such as an oral food challenge) may be needed to confirm an allergy.
  • People whose antibody levels get lower over time may develop a tolerance to eggs.

The most common symptoms of egg allergy are skin rash and itching or swelling of the skin.  Other symptoms that can occur include stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, nasal congestion, and wheezing or coughing.  Symptoms typically occur within a few minutes to several hours after consuming eggs. In severe cases, egg allergy may cause anaphylaxis which can be life-threatening.  It is important to note that people with some types of egg allergies will need to be careful about consuming not just eggs but products such as baked goods that contain eggs.  Reviewing your allergy test results with your doctor can help you determine which types of foods are safe for you to consume. Only a physician or allergy specialist can confirm an egg allergy by assessing your medical history and symptoms, along with your results.

For more testing options, please see out Allergy Testing Category.

Turnaround for this test is typically 3-5 business days.

Note: Result turn around times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Requirements:

This test requires no fasting or special preparations prior to specimen collection.

Categories:


Egg Component Allergy Test

Ovalbumin, Ovomucoid


Test Code: 91372
Specimen Type: Blood

Description:

Egg Component Allergy Test

This test is used to determine if a person may have an allergic reaction to eggs.  Most allergies to chicken eggs are caused by a reaction to the egg whites.  It is rare for an allergic reaction to be triggered by the yolk.  The egg component test looks for IgE antibodies to 2 specific proteins found in egg whites, Ovalbumin and Ovomucoid.  Both ovalbumin and ovomucoid are present in raw eggs, but ovalbumin breaks down at higher temperatures, such as when the egg is cooked.  Having IgE antibodies against a specific egg protein can indicate if a person is more likely to have allergic symptoms. The amount of IgE antibodies a person has can also give an indication of whether or not they are likely to develop a tolerance later in life.

  • Negative IgE results for both ovalbumin and ovomucoid typically mean that a person is unlikely to have an allergic reaction to eggs. However, an allergic reaction can occur even if the results are negative.
  • A positive result for IgE antibodies to ovalbumin alone typically means that a person will be able to eat eggs that are fully cooked, but not when they are raw.
  • A positive result for IgE antibodies to ovomucoid typically means that a person may not be able to tolerate either raw or cooked eggs. 
  • People with low levels of antibodies may develop a tolerance over time but higher antibody levels indicate an allergy which is likely to persist for life.
  • It is important to note that this test helps predict your risk of having a reaction and does not necessarily mean that you will have allergy symptoms. Additional tests (such as an oral food challenge) may be needed to confirm an allergy.
  • People whose antibody levels get lower over time may develop a tolerance to eggs.

The most common symptoms of egg allergy are skin rash and itching or swelling of the skin.  Other symptoms that can occur include stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, nasal congestion, and wheezing or coughing.  Symptoms typically occur within a few minutes to several hours after consuming eggs. In severe cases, egg allergy may cause anaphylaxis which can be life-threatening.  It is important to note that people with some types of egg allergies will need to be careful about consuming not just eggs but products such as baked goods that contain eggs.  Reviewing your allergy test results with your doctor can help you determine which types of foods are safe for you to consume. Only a physician or allergy specialist can confirm an egg allergy by assessing your medical history and symptoms, along with your results.

For more testing options, please see out Allergy Testing Category.

Turnaround for this test is typically 3-5 business days.

Note: Result turn around times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Categories: