Hepatitis A Panel

Total and IgM Antibodies


Test Code: 006734, 006726
Specimen Type: Blood

Description:

Hepatitis A Panel

This test is used to help determine if someone may have had recent or past exposure to Hepatitis A.  Hepatitis A is a liver infection which is typically spread through exposure to contaminated fecal matter.  While most cases of Hep A resolve on their own without causing serious health issues, some rare cases may cause more severe health complications and may even be fatal.  Those with the most serious risk include people already suffering from other forms of liver disease and older people with weakened immune systems.  Some of the common ways Hep A is spread include

  • Through contaminated drinking water
  • Eating food prepared by someone who has not properly washed their hands
  • Eating produce that has not been properly washed
  • Eating seafood raised in contaminated water
  • Through some forms of sexual contact
  • Exposure to infected blood

Results for this Hepatitis A Test will include a positive or negative result for both IgM antibodies and Total Antibodies (IgM +IgG). A positive IgM result typically indicates that a person has been exposed to Hep A in the recent past.  Common symptoms of Hep A include lack of energy, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, headache, muscle aches, and jaundice.  Most Hep A infections will clear up on their own within a few months.  Typically, once someone has had Hep A and recovered they will develop a natural immunity which will protect them from catching it again.  A vaccine against Hep A is also available and most people in the US are vaccinated when they are infants.  Someone who has been vaccinated or recovered from Hep A will typically have IgG antibodies which provide immunity.  While a test for just IgG antibodies is not available, the Total Antibody test looks for both IgM and IgG antibodies.  Typically, a negative IgM test along with a positive total antibody test indicates that a person has the IgG antibodies present and has immunity to Hep A.   

This test is typically ordered when a person is suspected of having a Hepatitis A infection.  It may also be ordered to help determine if a person has immunity to Hep A.   For additional Hepatitis testing options, please see our Hepatitis Category.

Turnaround for this test is typically 1-2 business days.

Note: Result turn around times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Incubation Period:

IgM antibodies are typically detectable 2-3 weeks after exposure and fade out after 3-6 months.  IgG antiboides are typically detectable at 305 weeks from exposure and will persist for life.

Requirements:

It is recommended that someone taking Biotin (also known as vitamin B7 or B8, vitamin H, or coenzyme R) stop consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection of a sample.

Categories:


Hepatitis A Panel

Total and IgM Antibodies


Test Code: 512, 508
Specimen Type: Blood

Description:

Hepatitis A Panel

This test is used to help determine if someone may have had recent or past exposure to Hepatitis A.  Hepatitis A is a liver infection which is typically spread through exposure to contaminated fecal matter.  While most cases of Hep A resolve on their own without causing serious health issues, some rare cases may cause more severe health complications and may even be fatal.  Those with the most serious risk include people already suffering from other forms of liver disease and older people with weakened immune systems.  Some of the common ways Hep A is spread include

  • Through contaminated drinking water
  • Eating food prepared by someone who has not properly washed their hands
  • Eating produce that has not been properly washed
  • Eating seafood raised in contaminated water
  • Through some forms of sexual contact
  • Exposure to infected blood

Results for this Hepatitis A Test will include a positive or negative result for both IgM antibodies and Total Antibodies (IgM +IgG). A positive IgM result typically indicates that a person has been exposed to Hep A in the recent past.  Common symptoms of Hep A include lack of energy, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, headache, muscle aches, and jaundice.  Most Hep A infections will clear up on their own within a few months.  Typically, once someone has had Hep A and recovered they will develop a natural immunity which will protect them from catching it again.  A vaccine against Hep A is also available and most people in the US are vaccinated when they are infants.  Someone who has been vaccinated or recovered from Hep A will typically have IgG antibodies which provide immunity.  While a test for just IgG antibodies is not available, the Total Antibody test looks for both IgM and IgG antibodies.  Typically, a negative IgM test along with a positive total antibody test indicates that a person has the IgG antibodies present and has immunity to Hep A.   

This test is typically ordered when a person is suspected of having a Hepatitis A infection.  It may also be ordered to help determine if a person has immunity to Hep A.   For additional Hepatitis testing options, please see our Hepatitis Category.

Turnaround for this test is typically 1-2 business days.

Note: Result turn around times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Incubation Period:

IgM antibodies are typically detectable 2-3 weeks after exposure and fade out after 3-6 months.  IgG antiboides are typically detectable at 305 weeks from exposure and will persist for life.

Requirements:

Dietary supplements containing biotin (also known as vitamin B7 or B8, vitamin H, or coenzyme R) may interfere in assays and may skew results to be either falsely high or falsely low. For people receiving the recommended daily doses of biotin, draw samples at least 8 hours following the last biotin supplementation. For people on mega-doses of biotin supplements, draw samples at least 72 hours following the last biotin supplementation.

Categories:


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